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always spoke of russia in negative terms. of course i did not like that. that is why i was rooting for obama to win. >> obama always said he did not want another cold war, and that is a huge positive for the relationship between the u.s. and russia. the reaction from the kremlin was less enthusiastic. after putin was reelected, several meetings were scheduled and then canceled until he finally met with obama this summer. moscow was struggling to maintain its status as a world power, and that has made for confrontation with washington on a number of issues, from the war in syria to missile defense in europe. >> here, that ties are viewed as the norm, but that is not normal. it does damage. it prevents russia from fulfilling important tasks, especially the long-overdue process of modernization. >> right now, putin is keeping tight control on things at home, and he uses his opposition to america to rally the masses behind him. >> for more on what the president's reelection means for u.s. foreign policy, we are joined in the studio by markets of the swp german institute for internation
, his efforts are already having an effect. >> in russia, a new law has come into force, requiring organizations that receive funding from abroad to register as foreign agents. dam it conscious of the days of the cold war, and the affected groups are not at all happy about those implications. >> many plan to boycott the law, including an election watchdog. >> this russian election watchdog now has to declare itself a foreign agent because it receives funding from the u.s. and europe. >> it is clear to us that any group that does not register as an agent and is viewed as a nuisance by the state apparatus will be first to be put through the wringer by the authorities. >> the new law passed through parliament during the summer with virtually no public outcry. it is backed by the ruling united russia party, which is allied to president vladimir putin. supporters of the law say it is simply a way to identify groups involved in russian politics who use funds from overseas. >> i do not think it is repression. it is just a way of classifying politically active citizens groups. may be someo
now in terms of how will it be taken forward with russia and china? will there be confrontation? the question that's going to be asked and needs to be asked is because strategy is needed is to go to the russians and say basically, now what do you want? the president is there for four more years, no more elections, what is it that you want? deliver what the russians or not? cold war they want or what is -- what consequences of that? from what i understand the foreign minister of russia was meeting with the gulf ministers, the gcc ministers, i, from what my information is he did not give in. they are standing exactly where they were. this is not -- the strategy is needed. it is not a strategy, and the u.s., no matter how much we try to run away from that situation in syria and israel and iran, it's, yeah, light footed or heavy footed, leadership is needed. >> one follow-up question. do you see the current situation, you talked about the instability and opportunity as they say in america, an opportunity to change the channel. is it likely an opportunity for assad to change the chan
meaningful contributions now? the contribution does not have to be militarily? russia, i would suggest, should be called upon to step up and belly up to the u.n. security council. they should exert influence. day, i suggest, are the most influential at this time, and they have the ability, number one, to stop supporting this regime that is slaughtering its citizens, to stop, by its acquiescence, standing on the sidelines and letting it happen while the rest of the world realize its hands. >> how do you accomplish that? >> i think they can assert influence in syria. they are one of the few countries that really can at this point. iran, forget it. >> how? what they can support the security camera resolutions, which thus far we have been unable to achieve -- security council resolutions, which we have been unable to achieve. >> what i think we are talking about here is, where do we intervene? where do we not? what is the rationale for doing so or to not do so? i think it's got to be based on one fundamental principle -- our interests, our values, and our values are our interests. i say ab
] and in russia. 7% of the world's energy is here. -- 70% of the world's energy is here. briefly on human-rights, i do believe actually the great difference between democracy and dictatorship is simply this -- a soft assets, but an important one. and it does not have human- rights that i necessarily proud of, but india does have accountability. china can only become a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, that is equality and presence of trade. until then, it can be successful, but not monitored. >> i want to say three things quickly. i want to follow up on the admirals' comments. it is remarkable to many in the u.s. military that the u.s. is not ratified the convention. we had it pretty sincere effort to bring afford to the senate. we worked a couple of the votes short. i think senator mikulski for her support. i hope we will be allowed to take that up again and get that done as a country. it is challenging to make the case we're making, which is that these potential conflicts over territory should be resolved on the basis of principles when the final conven
in syria. we've seen three security council vetoes by russia and china causing many to call the u.n., essentially, ineffective in this crisis. so it's been the interplay of these three factors, i would argue, that has led syria down the path that it has taken. in terms of u.s. policy, u.s. policy is based on the objective of having assad, as president obama called for, step aside. this was back in august of 2011. the problem with u.s. policy is that it has continually been at conflict with itself in terms of how to achieve that objective while also achieving or protecting u.s. national security interests in the region. namely, i would argue, very understandable concerns about, about the impact of unseating assad and the potential for massive instability across the region. so at the crux of u.s. policy on syria, i would argue, has resided this tension of wanting assad to go but being concerned and fearful about how to achieve that objective while also seeking to maintain stability in such a volatile region of the world. now, the debate right now on syria is focused largely on this
statute and it caused turmoil between estonia and russia and lo and behold if it didn't become a lot of cyberattacks on mr. linea shutting down their telephone networks commissioning down their banking systems, websites and so on. government services and so on. it was never proven of his russia doing it, but the conclusion is that the very least of his russian hackers. in the end, nato, who is very active in helping estonia understand this, nato step dad and ultimately there's a cyberdefense center both selection. estonia is the most connected country in europe. they are a leader in the government. that's when of the reasons why estonia is super interesting. i don't know how much my time -- am i good? >> you are good. >> i'm going to spend a couple minor on other ones. okay, so there's lots of incidents in my side of e-mail, targeted attacks to u.s. satellites. it looks like someone from china. i'm not saying chinese government, but someone through china for mr. cheney servers appear to have been doing the proof of concept. they were trained to see whether they could get him into the
.s. intelligence has identified three command and control servers. one is in russia and one in the states that are sending commands to this virus and the u.s. intelligence has now at a later concluded with a high degree of confidence that this virus was developed by state-sponsored actors in excess land, and not in the high degree of confidence that there is a shadow out there that they have another target and that this virus is not going to stay on the leal companies that could move -- oil companies that could move. if you want to start? >> i think so, given the "washington post" sources we don't have to worry about. [laughter] but now i think one, the general realization that we have not seen everything yet sold, second, typical of the cyber type of activities they are probably most crippling in undermining confidence over the public so they need courses of action to address this in the public and how they will do this we haven't really gotten the sense of the external overseas type of the implications from the standpoint of other damage out there. we need to know from the intelligence
, the stans, russia, china, all the countries that have interest in afghanistan. their calculus would be affected by our signing a bilateral agreement. >> so i think it is a very important answer. i have the same feeling. i think islamabad is the first capital that would be affected by the bilateral agreement. tying some elements of the pakistani government to terrorist groups. they are hedging their bets for what happens the day after we leave. if we're not leaving presumably, they lose that argument. but, you know, there is -- every situation is different. i can't help but relate this to iraq. nobody wanted our discussions with the iraqi government for a presence in iraq after our troops left to fail more than iran did. and in fact, they were working on that. the fact that it did fail and we have no continuing presence in iraq i think is part of the reason why iran's influences spread there and so incidentally has al qaeda re- emerged again. i think those are warnings to us about how important it is to do exactly what you have called for, which is to have a good -- much smaller but
critical level. this here comment usaid was booted out of russia initially when i went there to help the russian people, one of the first things they did with the help of the russians to two extreme poverty. my question is, is the risk too much for us so that we would basically go winhelp the nation and state thank you and don't let the door hit you on the way out? thank you. >> first of all, the indonesian case, part of that is just cultural. they are far more sensitive to questions of faith than we are. so it's not infrequent that we would behave in a way that doesn't take into account adequately their cultural sensitivities. but this happens all the time in life and i think you have to ask yourself what's the right thing to do and you try and do it. if you make your very best effort and someone isn't appreciative, you didn't do anything wrong. don't worry about it. and sometimes that happens. i wouldn't hesitate to help people because someone related to a recipient is resentful that they weren't helped by their own kind. i would want to help. >> if i could have something to the in
. the legislative agenda this week includes discussion with trade of russia. live coverage of the house is here on c-span. also at 2:00 eastern live coverage of the senate as members resume consideration of a sportsman bill. off the floor this week members ofts congress will hold hearings on the terrorist in benghazi attack that killed leaders. and a meeting with president obama about fiscal issues. in a few moments a book tv event with paula brot we will. petraeus designed after an f.b.i. investigation uncovered an extramarital affair. then a forum with two med doll of honor recipients and the joint chiefs of staff retired general richard myers. several live events to tell you about tomorrow morning t. new america foundation hosts a discussion on how going over the fiscal cliff would effect the military, social security and medicare. that's on c-span2 at 9:00 eastern. at 10:00 eastern on c-span 3 looks at al qaeda groups in yemen. >> c-span invites middle and high school students to send a message to the president through a short video let the president know what's the most important issue he shoul
in the russians had behaved, i don't think we can give up on russia because they do know the syrian military there in getting bashar al-assad out of the country is not going to solve all the problems. if he leaves, particularly if he were to leave tomorrow, let's say, you would have fragmentation in syria for both sides this is an existential struggle. and alawite dominated army is not going to give up because bashar gave up. and the competition is not going to lay down their arms because bashar less. so i think we very much, if there's going to be any hope for resolution that keeps syria impact for the time being we need the russians, and we need putin, and we need them to recognize that their nihilistic attitude right now doesn't play well. and i would suggest that a number of countries might do better by putting pressure on russia rather than excoriating the united states. i do believe in military intervention. i think we could very well find ourselves backing one side and then only to find that we're incapable of stopping them from occurring the other side if they defeat them. we've seen
to end up like russia. there are thousands of family in cincinnati that have led from socialism. if we have obama as president socialism will be in the united states. host: less of a map to get a sense of where the candidates have been. -- let's look at a map to get a sense of where the candidates have been. all the candidates have been crisscrossing ohio. the other battleground states colorado, iowa, and now wisconsin. minnesota is in play. a romney in pennsylvania. the states of getting the most attention since the party conventions. they have been traveling to a total of 10 states. later this afternoon we will have live coverage of bombing donald. he will be joined by two of the romney sons. they are in virginia. good afternoon. caller: hello. i voted for obama because i am highly impressed with his leadership and the leadership he has shown throughout his administration. i am also impressed with his vice-president mr. joe biden. they work together as a team. we need to finish what we started. i also enjoyed listening to mr. biden's comment today about mitt romney. he said mitt romn
of italy, king abdullah of jordan, president putin of russia, and president rohoi of spain. lie take your questions. >> a couple of questions about the scandal that many of us are covering. one specific and a bigger picture one. general allen we're learning questions about him and the pentagon's investigation of his alleged behavior. does the president have faith that general allen can continue to lead the war in afghanistan in this critical period of time when he's under investigation by the pentagon? >> i can tell you that the president thinks very highly of general allen and his service to his country, as well as the job he has done in afghanistan. at the request of the secretary of defense the president has put on hold general allen's nomination as supreme allied commander of europe pending the investigation of general allen's conduct by the department of defense i.g. the president remains focused on supporting our extraordinary troops and coalition partners in afghanistan who general allen continues to lead as he has done ablebly in over a year. the president nominated general dunfor
have serious and continuing differences with russia -- on syria, missile defense, nato enlargement, a human-rights, and other issues. so we have to take a smart and balanced approach going forward. we need to continue expanding our engagement with russia, but with very clear rise about where we draw our lines. we also have to engage with a set of the emerging democratic powers like brazil and mexico, india and indonesia, south africa and turkey, that are exercising greater influence in their region and on the world stage. the strategic fundamentals of these relationships, shared democratic values, common economic and security priorities, are pushing our interests and do closer convergence. this is reflected in the broad strategic dialogue we have launched with the emerging powers. the key going forward will be to encourage them to leave behind the outdated politics of the past and take up the responsibilities that come with global influence, including defending our shared democratic values beyond their borders. let me turn to the third element of our agenda, what i call economic st
in a stone in 2007 during a dispute with russia -- estonia, and various banks and government institutions in estonia were hit with denial of service attacks. just to say, attacks that kept those institutions from at least running on the internet, capped their websites working, maybe disrupted their operations one way or another the interestingly in response to the estonia events, nato established a cybersecurity center of excellence in estonia in 2008, and they've been studying this from nader's perspective from a law of war perspective since then. recently published a very comprehensive treatise on the subject of law of war and cyber warfare. you see the same thing in georgia. press accounts suggesting that the russian government was behind cyberattacks that occurred contemporaneously prior to land forces going into georgia in 2008. and there are other examples like this, and is one of the panelists mentioned, as john mentioned in his introduction, even secretary panetta recently gave a speech, and according to press accounts officials at dod have suggested that iran has been behind a nu
to russia today, television, and he said he's not going anywhere. i'm not a puppet. i was not made by the west, he said, to go to the west or to any other country. i'm a syrian. i was made in syria. i have to live in syria. and die in syria. that might sound a little bit familiar because if you replaced syria with word libya, it sounds like moammar gadhafi. >> turkish officials saying they're talking with nato of a possible deployment of missiles. >> their concern is cross-border violence going on over several months and killed turkish citizens on the turkish side of the border and lead to a spillover. they're concerned about that. the turkish president has said that this is something that's discussed. and this is an effort to contain the violence and not allow it to spill over. this is giving you a sense of the regional quality, the regional sort of how regionally this could spill over to syria. we have seen it in leb anna nicole and turkey and jordan. >> maybe a possible no-fly zone? >> i think we are far from that. very far from that idea. right now. there's no appetite because
? ahead of russia by 2020? >> yeah. one of the ironies is over the last couple of years, the oil industry, fossil fuel, the evil fossil fuel created so many jobs and so much wealth. look at pennsylvania alone, you got to worry about them coming under attack, particularly natural gas. you got a big hollywood movie coming out, anti-fracking and all that stuff. >> steve: the president later today will meet interestingly with union leaders and business leaders, tomorrow he'll meet with ceo's and congress and try to avert the fiscal cliff. what do you make of the meeting with the union guys? >> i got a huge beef with this. unions represent only 8% of sec. there is no way in the world they should be the first ones up. by the way, this is all look just like his jobs council. nothing but academics, union leaders and gigantic businesses. where is the small business? guys, let me tell you, businesses with less than 50 please created 13,000 jobs. where would the president and the country be without them? they never get a seat at the able. we crush them, we crush any hope for recovery. >> brian: we'l
, switzerland, and russia here to watch that process and to take tests. this is all happening just as everyone commemorates the advisory, the eight-year anniversary of arafat's death. his family very upset and there has always been suspicion that arafat was murdered when he died in a french hospital in 2004. sara sidner, cnn, ramallah. >>> happening now. spreading scandal. new claims about general john allen's contacts with the woman who helped trigger the david petraeus investigation. also, another surprising new twist leads back to petraeus' former lover, paula broadwell and her e-mail trail. >>> and the president's staffing up for his second term. he appears blindsided by this sensational mess. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> the top u.s. military commander in afghanistan appears to be fighting back, trying not to be brought down by scandal, as general david petraeus was. general john allen is under investigation by the defense department, and his nomination to be the military head of nato is now on hold. at issue, allen's contacts with jill kelly, who played a role in
them towards that will be huge. with issues in russia where radio free europe radio free europe basic or shut down its operations because they can't get the licensing because the government refuses to allow licenses to reading stations. we're going to see that. that to me, how we continue to use technology to push public diplomacy forward towards regimes that are going to use technology or intimidation to prevent that i think is going to really determine how the next four years ago. [inaudible] >> i would. it's a law that stops the state department from communicating with americans. it does present a lot of problems in an internet age. can i just add one thing? what p.j. said reminded me that i may have forgotten the most important legacy of all, and one of the things i meant to say here, which is i think that public diplomacy needs a big success. i think for public diplomacy to grow and become more important, we need to be able, the mecca people need to be able to point to something and say hey, that works. so for example, most americans believe that radio free europe helped bring do
buy to bring russia to work out a deal with us to find solution to go forward instead of saying no, no, no, and no again. so i think -- i just want to make the point that paula also made as wonderful as, you know, the modern tools are, the world will not allow us to get away with just tools. we will need to confront these situations, and i think the moment is here where it is overdue, it is extremely urgent to try to find a way that will end the killing in syria not only because it has canings for israel and other countries in indonesia, but because it sits, of course, a terrible negative example to others bad guys in this region and elsewhere who will be encouraged if they can get away with these types of behavior if we don't act. so i think this is a huge challenge that we need to face. and the solution is not a military solution. it's a smart one. >> we have to wrap up soon. to get the conference back on schedule. two more comments here and back there to get them in. >> thank you very much. [inaudible] i'm the australia commissioner in australia. i'm afraid on -- [inaudible] i wante
be highly desirable to find a way to bring russia to work out a deal for us to say no, no, no i just want to make the point that as wonderful as all the modern tools are they will not allow us to just tools to consult the situations and i think the moment is here. it is over dewey and extremely urgent to try to find a way that will end the killing and syria not only because of israel and other countries in the region but because it sets a - example to other bad guys in the region and elsewhere who will be encouraged that they can get away with these types of behavior if we don't act so this is a huge challenge we have to face even is not a military solution, it is a smart diplomacy. >> we have to wrap up pretty soon but let me take two more comments from here and there. yes. >> thank you very much. my name is luis. i'm afraid i'm standing in for life defense secretary. i just want to make a point after having had a long period of being a diplomatic practitioner particularly in my part of the world in the china, asia, jakarta, they have some good news which i would like to throw in. there
abbas. >> the three conditions are put forward by the united states of america, russia, the independent united nations. they say stop shooting and start talking. we are not alone in that. if the world can agree that they can shoot and everything will be open and they won't be punished, it's a fantasy. i think even the egyptians understand deep in their hearts that this will not fly. and i'm presently surprised by the position taken by the president of egypt. >> mohamed morsi? >> yes. >> he's been doing a good job, in your view? >> i'm worried that his heart is somewhere else. but his behavior is responsible. and because responsibility is needed for everybody, for us and for them. you know, people say we are the problem. that's not the problem. hamas is losing peace. people say from the outside, newspapers, they say take out your settlements and lead your own life. nobody faults us. we have had 18 settlements. we took them out. there were close to 9,000 settl settlers. we left gaza free, open, gaza and israel. now we want to continue with the palestinians and people are saying, what are
with this as merit of urgency. russia already making its discomfort known, saying it's worried simply because nato is there in a military capacity. it could get drawn in, and we've seen this before. the turkish military firing back at the syrian regime when they shell into turkish territory. a very volatile situation here, and many observers thinking for once nato has that really sophisticated firepower on the border with syria, the no fly zone may end up emerging simply because it's going to be hard for people to know on the nato side, on the turkish side exactly what syrian regime activity amounts to being hostile or not. frederica. >> nick payton-walsh, thank you so much in beirut. >>> ahead on "newsroom international" anti-government rebels storm a critical city in the democratic republic of congo. now thousands are running from the violence. 's big news. presenting androgel 1.62%. both are used to treat men with low testosterone. androgel 1.62% is from the makers of the number one prescribed testosterone replacement therapy. it raises your testosterone levels, and... is concentrated, so you c
that could drag nato into the war, russia warned. >> translator: as i already said, the main concern is that the more weapons there are, the greater the risk that they will be used. and also any provocation could trigger it. >> reporter: winter will be unkind to the regime and its opponents. more refugees will struggle in freezing temperatures. but worse weather will also make it harder for the regime's main advantage, air power to fly. the hardest month for syrians may still be ahead. joe, i should point out what we've just seen in the report many people most traveling the intense shelling of these damascus suburbs namely there it seems to be that the regime is unable to push into these rebel strongholds there and is resorting to this heavy bombardment. but i'm sure there are people in the inner circle around president bashar al assad perhaps feeling nervous tonight. joe. >> nick paton walsh in beirut. >>> some charities are worried they might need their own lifeline with the country on the brink of a fiscal cliff. that's next. and actually share . ♪ the lexus december to remember
it to obviously her area of expertise is russia. it felt to me like this piece was almost fatalistic. she is calling for more american help, she is calling for a greater american leadership role but it sended to me, read to me like she really didn't expect that to happen. in that sense i agree with her. if you look at the campaign we've just been through the president of the united states and his vice president ran on a campaign that embraced this idea of leading from behind. they believe this is working, they believe this is successful. i think the opposite, it seems very clear that secretary rice believes the opposite. i don't think that we are likely to see the united states take a more significant role in the region any time soon, given the way that the president and joe biden ran for the past year. martha: there may be an irony in the fact that susan rice, who is being considered as the next secretary of state, you know, sort of failed to see the broader picture in what happened at benghazi and we wonder what the direction of the next secretary of state would be. i just put that out
to use the kind of diplomacy that i think would be highly desirable, to find a way to work with russia to work out a deal to go forward. i just want to make that point that paula also made. as wonderful as all the modern tools are, the world will not allow us to get away with tools. we will need to confront the situation, and i think the moment is here. it is overdue. it is extremely urgent to find a way to end the killing in syria. it sets a terrible example to other bad guys in the region and elsewhere if we do not act. >> we are going to have to wrap it up pretty soon, but we will take two more comments. >> thank you. in the australian high commissioner in ottawa. i am standing in for my defense secretary, but it is quite fun for me, if not for him. i want to make a point, having had a long period of being a diplomatic practitioner. particularly in my part of the world, indochina, asia, jakarta, our part of the world has different views. we know what has happened in china. thailand has sufficiently grown to no longer be a recipient of foreign aid. similarly, indonesia, which will sh
, first and foremost with a 49 capitals of the coalition. i also think the other capitals, iran, russia, china, all the countries that have interest in afghanistan. their calculus would be affected by signing a bilateral security agreement. more important, signing an agreement reflecting the commitment that was initially made in may 2012. >> i think it's a very important answer, and i have the same feeling, i think islamabad is the first couple that we affected by the pilots who could agreement, the whole argument refer to that part of the reason they continue to be tied to some elements of the pakistani government to terrorist groups like haqqani network and haqqani network and i is eyes, as they're hedging their bets for what happened the day after we leave if we're not leaving. presumably. they lose that argument. but there is, every situation is different, i can't help but relate this to iraq, that it seemed to me that nobody wanted our discussions with the iraqi government for our presence in iraq after our troops left to fail more than iran did. in fact, they were working on that,
be there beyond i had in mind, senator, first and, russia, china, all the calculus would be affected by a signing a bilateral security agreement. more importantly, signing an agreement reflecting well. >> i is and the others, i can't help it seems to me that they we have no continuing presence in iraq, nothing are warnings to what you were called for. which is to have a much smaller, me >> the leadership is that the afghan government is favorably disposed in a bilateral security agreement. clearly, the details both governments have come to both appear to be cautious and optimistic that we will be able to very. >> isn't keeping senator, i have i assessments my first question is do know what the command in that is interesting to me. a guy that's going to take over the command you had no impressions or ideas as to whether a troop drawdown issue between now and 2014? >> senator, have an understanding of framework in which that decision ought to be made. i certainly have identified the important burials that need to be made. i have not been involved in the detailed planning map so you are a blank slat
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)